SQL Server 2012 Diagnostic Information Queries — Glenn Berry (copied)

— Copied from http://sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn/
— SQL Server 2012 Diagnostic Information Queries
— Glenn Berry
— June 2016
— Last Modified: June 8, 2016
— http://sqlserverperformance.wordpress.com/
— http://sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn/
— Twitter: GlennAlanBerry

— Please listen to my Pluralsight courses
— http://www.pluralsight.com/author/glenn-berry

— Please make sure you are using the correct version of these diagnostic queries for your version of SQL Server
— Many of these queries will not work if you have databases in 80 compatibility mode

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— Check the major product version to see if it is SQL Server 2012
IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * WHERE CONVERT(varchar(128), SERVERPROPERTY(‘ProductVersion’)) LIKE ‘11%’)
BEGIN
DECLARE @ProductVersion varchar(128) = CONVERT(varchar(128), SERVERPROPERTY(‘ProductVersion’));
RAISERROR (‘Script does not match the ProductVersion [%s] of this instance. Many of these queries may not work on this version.’ , 18 , 16 , @ProductVersion);
END
ELSE
PRINT N’You have the correct major version of SQL Server for this diagnostic information script’;

— Instance level queries *******************************

— SQL and OS Version information for current instance (Query 1) (Version Info)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], @@VERSION AS [SQL Server and OS Version Info];
——

— SQL Server 2012 RTM Branch Builds SQL Server 2012 SP1 Branch Builds SQL Server 2012 SP2 Branch Builds SQL Server 2012 SP2 Branch Builds
— Build Description Release Date Build Description Release Date Build Description Release Date Build Description Release Date
— 11.0.2100 RTM 3/6/2012
— 11.0.2316 RTM CU1 4/12/2012
— 11.0.2325 RTM CU2 6/18/2012 –> 11.0.3000 SP1 RTM 11/7/2012
— 11.0.2332 RTM CU3 8/31/2012
— 11.0.2376 RTM CU3 + QFE 10/9/2012
— 11.0.2383 RTM CU4 10/15/2012 –> 11.0.3321 SP1 CU1 11/20/2012
— 11.0.2395 RTM CU5 12/17/2012 –> 11.0.3339 SP1 CU2 1/21/2013
— 11.0.2401 RTM CU6 2/18/2013 –> 11.0.3349 SP1 CU3 3/18/2013
— 11.0.2405 RTM CU7 4/15/2013 –> 11.0 3368 SP1 CU4 5/30/2013
— 11.0.2410 RTM CU8 6/17/2013 –> 11.0.3373 SP1 CU5 7/15/2013
— 11.0.2419 RTM CU9 8/20/2013 –> 11.0.3381 SP1 CU6 9/16/2013
— 11.0.2420 RTM CU10 10/21/2013 –> 11.0.3393 SP1 CU7 11/18/2013
— 11.0.2424 RTM CU11 12/16/2003 –> 11.0.3401 SP1 CU8 1/20/2014
— 11.0.3412 SP1 CU9 3/17/2014 –> 11.0.5058 SP2 RTM 6/10/2014
— 11.0.3431 SP1 CU10 5/19/2014
— 11.0.3449 SP1 CU11 7/21/2014 –> 11.0.5532 SP2 CU1 7/23/2014
— 11.0.3470 SP1 CU12 9/15/2014 –> 11.0.5548 SP2 CU2 9/15/2014
— 11.0.3482 SP1 CU13 11/17/2014–> 11.0.5556 SP2 CU3 11/17/2014
— 11.0.3486 SP1 CU14 1/19/2015 –> 11.0.5569 SP2 CU4 1/19/2015
— 11.0.5571 SP2 CU4 + COD HF 2/4/2015
— 11.0.3487 SP1 CU15 3/16/2015 –> 11.0.5582 SP2 CU5 3/16/2015
— 11.0.3492 SP1 CU16 5/18/2015 –> 11.0.5592 SP2 CU6 5/18/2015
— 11.0.5623 SP2 CU7 7/20/2015
— 11.0.5634 SP2 CU8 9/21/2015
— 11.0.5641 SP2 CU9 11/16/2015 —-> 11.0.6290 SP3 RTM 11/22/2015
— 11.0.5644 SP2 CU10 1/18/2016 —-> 11.0.6518 SP3 CU1 1/18/2016
— 11.0.5646 SP2 CU11 3/21/2016 —-> 11.0.6523 SP3 CU2 3/21/2016
— 11.0.5649 SP2 CU12 5/16/2016 —-> 11.0.6537 SP3 CU3 5/16/2016

— How to determine the version, edition and update level of SQL Server and its components
— https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/321185

— SQL Server 2012 SP3 build versions
— https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/3133750

— SQL Server 2012 SP2 build versions
— http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2983249

— The SQL Server 2012 builds that were released after SQL Server 2012 Service Pack 1 was released
— http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2772858

— The SQL Server 2012 builds that were released after SQL Server 2012 was released
— http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2692828

— Recommended updates and configuration options for SQL Server 2012 and SQL Server 2014 used with high-performance workloads
— http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2964518/EN-US

— Performance and Stability Related Fixes in Post-SQL Server 2012 SP3 Builds
— http://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn/performance-and-stability-related-fixes-in-post-sql-server-2012-sp3-builds/

— Performance and Stability Related Fixes in Post-SQL Server 2012 SP2 Builds
— http://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn/performance-and-stability-related-fixes-in-post-sql-server-2012-sp2-builds/

— Performance and Stability Related Fixes in Post-SQL Server 2012 SP1 Builds
— http://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn/performance-and-stability-related-fixes-in-post-sql-server-2012-sp1-builds-2/

— Performance Related Fixes in Post-SQL Server 2012 RTM Builds
— http://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn/performance-related-fixes-in-post-sql-server-2012-rtm-builds/

— Get socket, physical core and logical core count from the SQL Server Error log. (Query 2) (Core Counts)
— This query might take a few seconds if you have not recycled your error log recently
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N’detected’, N’socket’;
——

— This can help you determine the exact core counts used by SQL Server and whether HT is enabled or not
— It can also help you confirm your SQL Server licensing model
— Be on the lookout for this message “using 20 logical processors based on SQL Server licensing”
— which means grandfathered Server/CAL licensing
— This query will return no results if your error log has been recycled since the instance was last started

— Get selected server properties (Query 3) (Server Properties)
SELECT SERVERPROPERTY(‘MachineName’) AS [MachineName],
SERVERPROPERTY(‘ServerName’) AS [ServerName],
SERVERPROPERTY(‘InstanceName’) AS [Instance],
SERVERPROPERTY(‘IsClustered’) AS [IsClustered],
SERVERPROPERTY(‘ComputerNamePhysicalNetBIOS’) AS [ComputerNamePhysicalNetBIOS],
SERVERPROPERTY(‘Edition’) AS [Edition],
SERVERPROPERTY(‘ProductLevel’) AS [ProductLevel], — What servicing branch (RTM/SP/CU)
SERVERPROPERTY(‘ProductUpdateLevel’) AS [ProductUpdateLevel], — Within a servicing branch, what CU# is applied
SERVERPROPERTY(‘ProductVersion’) AS [ProductVersion],
SERVERPROPERTY(‘ProductMajorVersion’) AS [ProductMajorVersion],
SERVERPROPERTY(‘ProductMinorVersion’) AS [ProductMinorVersion],
SERVERPROPERTY(‘ProductBuild’) AS [ProductBuild],
SERVERPROPERTY(‘ProductBuildType’) AS [ProductBuildType], — Is this a GDR or OD hotfix (NULL if on a CU build)
SERVERPROPERTY(‘ProductUpdateReference’) AS [ProductUpdateReference], — KB article number that is applicable for this build
SERVERPROPERTY(‘ProcessID’) AS [ProcessID],
SERVERPROPERTY(‘Collation’) AS [Collation],
SERVERPROPERTY(‘IsFullTextInstalled’) AS [IsFullTextInstalled],
SERVERPROPERTY(‘IsIntegratedSecurityOnly’) AS [IsIntegratedSecurityOnly],
SERVERPROPERTY(‘FilestreamConfiguredLevel’) AS [FilestreamConfiguredLevel],
SERVERPROPERTY(‘IsHadrEnabled’) AS [IsHadrEnabled],
SERVERPROPERTY(‘HadrManagerStatus’) AS [HadrManagerStatus],
SERVERPROPERTY(‘InstanceDefaultDataPath’) AS [InstanceDefaultDataPath],
SERVERPROPERTY(‘InstanceDefaultLogPath’) AS [InstanceDefaultLogPath],
SERVERPROPERTY(‘BuildClrVersion’) AS [Build CLR Version];
——

— This gives you a lot of useful information about your instance of SQL Server,
— such as the ProcessID for SQL Server and your collation
— Note: Some columns will be NULL on older SQL Server builds

— Get instance-level configuration values for instance (Query 4) (Configuration Values)
SELECT name, value, value_in_use, minimum, maximum, [description], is_dynamic, is_advanced
FROM sys.configurations WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Focus on these settings:
— backup compression default (should be 1 in most cases)
— clr enabled (only enable if it is needed)
— cost threshold for parallelism (depends on your workload)
— lightweight pooling (should be zero)
— max degree of parallelism (depends on your workload and hardware)
— max server memory (MB) (set to an appropriate value, not the default)
— optimize for ad hoc workloads (should be 1)
— priority boost (should be zero)
— remote admin connections (should be 1)

— Returns a list of all global trace flags that are enabled (Query 5) (Global Trace Flags)
DBCC TRACESTATUS (-1);
——

— If no global trace flags are enabled, no results will be returned.
— It is very useful to know what global trace flags are currently enabled as part of the diagnostic process.

— Common trace flags that should be enabled in most cases
— TF 1118 – Helps alleviate allocation contention in tempdb, SQL Server allocates full extents to each database object,
— thereby eliminating the contention on SGAM pages (more important with older versions of SQL Server)
— Recommendations to reduce allocation contention in SQL Server tempdb database
— http://support2.microsoft.com/kb/2154845
— TF 3226 – Supresses logging of successful database backup messages to the SQL Server Error Log
— TF 2371 – Lowers auto update statistics threshold for large tables
— http://blogs.msdn.com/b/saponsqlserver/archive/2011/09/07/changes-to-automatic-update-statistics-in-sql-server-traceflag-2371.aspx

— SQL Server query optimizer hotfix trace flag 4199 servicing model
— https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/974006

— SQL Server Process Address space info (Query 6) (Process Memory)
— (shows whether locked pages is enabled, among other things)
SELECT physical_memory_in_use_kb/1024 AS [SQL Server Memory Usage (MB)],
large_page_allocations_kb, locked_page_allocations_kb, page_fault_count,
memory_utilization_percentage, available_commit_limit_kb,
process_physical_memory_low, process_virtual_memory_low
FROM sys.dm_os_process_memory WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— You want to see 0 for process_physical_memory_low
— You want to see 0 for process_virtual_memory_low
— This indicates that you are not under internal memory pressure

— SQL Server Services information (Query 7) (SQL Server Services Info)
SELECT servicename, process_id, startup_type_desc, status_desc,
last_startup_time, service_account, is_clustered, cluster_nodename, [filename]
FROM sys.dm_server_services WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Tells you the account being used for the SQL Server Service and the SQL Agent Service
— Shows the process_id, when they were last started, and their current status
— Shows whether you are running on a failover cluster instance

— Get SQL Server Agent jobs and Category information (Query 8) (SQL Server Agent Jobs)
SELECT sj.name AS [JobName], sj.[description] AS [JobDescription], SUSER_SNAME(sj.owner_sid) AS [JobOwner],
sj.date_created, sj.[enabled], sj.notify_email_operator_id, sj.notify_level_email, sc.name AS [CategoryName],
js.next_run_date, js.next_run_time
FROM msdb.dbo.sysjobs AS sj WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.syscategories AS sc WITH (NOLOCK)
ON sj.category_id = sc.category_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysjobschedules AS js WITH (NOLOCK)
ON sj.job_id = js.job_id
ORDER BY sj.name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Gives you some basic information about your SQL Server Agent jobs, who owns them and how they are configured
— Look for Agent jobs that are not owned by sa
— Look for jobs that have a notify_email_operator_id set to 0 (meaning no operator)
— Look for jobs that have a notify_level_email set to 0 (meaning no e-mail is ever sent)

— MSDN sysjobs documentation
— http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189817.aspx

— Get SQL Server Agent Alert Information (Query 9) (SQL Server Agent Alerts)
SELECT name, event_source, message_id, severity, [enabled], has_notification,
delay_between_responses, occurrence_count, last_occurrence_date, last_occurrence_time
FROM msdb.dbo.sysalerts WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Gives you some basic information about your SQL Server Agent Alerts (which are different from SQL Server Agent jobs)
— Read more about Agent Alerts here: http://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn/creating-sql-server-agent-alerts-for-critical-errors/

— Windows information (Query 10) (Windows Info)
SELECT windows_release, windows_service_pack_level,
windows_sku, os_language_version
FROM sys.dm_os_windows_info WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Gives you major OS version, Service Pack, Edition, and language info for the operating system
— 6.3 is either Windows 8.1, Windows 10 or Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Server 2016
— 6.2 is either Windows 8 or Windows Server 2012
— 6.1 is either Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2
— 6.0 is either Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008

— Windows SKU codes
— 4 is Enterprise Edition
— 7 is Standard Server Edition
— 8 is Datacenter Server Edition
— 10 is Enterprise Server Edition
— 48 is Professional Edition

— 1033 for os_language_version is US-English

— SQL Server 2012 requires Windows Server 2008 SP2 or newer

— Hardware and Software Requirements for Installing SQL Server 2012
— http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms143506.aspx

— Using SQL Server in Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2 environments
— http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2681562

— SQL Server NUMA Node information (Query 11) (SQL Server NUMA Info)
SELECT node_id, node_state_desc, memory_node_id, processor_group, online_scheduler_count,
active_worker_count, avg_load_balance, resource_monitor_state
FROM sys.dm_os_nodes WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE node_state_desc <> N’ONLINE DAC’ OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Gives you some useful information about the composition and relative load on your NUMA nodes
— You want to see an equal number of schedulers on each NUMA node
— Watch out if SQL Server 2012 Standard Edition has been installed on a machine with more than 16 physical cores

— Balancing Your Available SQL Server Core Licenses Evenly Across NUMA Nodes
— http://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn/balancing-your-available-sql-server-core-licenses-evenly-across-numa-nodes/

— Good basic information about OS memory amounts and state (Query 12) (System Memory)
SELECT total_physical_memory_kb/1024 AS [Physical Memory (MB)],
available_physical_memory_kb/1024 AS [Available Memory (MB)],
total_page_file_kb/1024 AS [Total Page File (MB)],
available_page_file_kb/1024 AS [Available Page File (MB)],
system_cache_kb/1024 AS [System Cache (MB)],
system_memory_state_desc AS [System Memory State]
FROM sys.dm_os_sys_memory WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— You want to see “Available physical memory is high” for System Memory State
— This indicates that you are not under external memory pressure

— You can skip the next three queries if you know you don’t
— have a clustered instance

— Shows you where the SQL Server failover cluster diagnostic log is located and how it is configured (Query 13) (SQL Server Error Log)
SELECT is_enabled, [path], max_size, max_files
FROM sys.dm_os_server_diagnostics_log_configurations WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Knowing this information is important for troubleshooting purposes
— Also shows you the location of other error and diagnostic log files

— Get information about your cluster nodes and their status (Query 14) (Cluster Node Properties)
— (if your database server is in a failover cluster)
SELECT NodeName, status_description, is_current_owner
FROM sys.dm_os_cluster_nodes WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Knowing which node owns the cluster resources is critical
— Especially when you are installing Windows or SQL Server updates
— You will see no results if your instance is not clustered

— Get information about any AlwaysOn AG cluster this instance is a part of (Query 15) (AlwaysOn AG Cluster)
SELECT cluster_name, quorum_type_desc, quorum_state_desc
FROM sys.dm_hadr_cluster WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— You will see no results if your instance is not using AlwaysOn AGs

— Recommended hotfixes and updates for Windows Server 2012 R2-based failover clusters
— http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2920151

— Hardware information from SQL Server 2012 (Query 16) (Hardware Info)
SELECT cpu_count AS [Logical CPU Count], scheduler_count, hyperthread_ratio AS [Hyperthread Ratio],
cpu_count/hyperthread_ratio AS [Physical CPU Count],
physical_memory_kb/1024 AS [Physical Memory (MB)], committed_kb/1024 AS [Committed Memory (MB)],
committed_target_kb/1024 AS [Committed Target Memory (MB)],
max_workers_count AS [Max Workers Count], affinity_type_desc AS [Affinity Type],
sqlserver_start_time AS [SQL Server Start Time], virtual_machine_type_desc AS [Virtual Machine Type]
FROM sys.dm_os_sys_info WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Gives you some good basic hardware information about your database server
— Cannot distinguish between HT and multi-core
— Note: virtual_machine_type_desc of HYPERVISOR does not automatically mean you are running SQL Server inside of a VM
— It merely indicates that you have a hypervisor running on your host

— Get System Manufacturer and model number from SQL Server Error log (Query 17) (System Manufacturer)
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N’Manufacturer’;
——

— This can help you determine the capabilities and capacities of your database server
— Can also be used to confirm if you are running in a VM
— This query might take a few seconds if you have not recycled your error log recently
— This query will return no results if your error log has been recycled since the instance was started

— Get processor description from Windows Registry (Query 18) (Processor Description)
EXEC sys.xp_instance_regread N’HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE’, N’HARDWARE\DESCRIPTION\System\CentralProcessor\0′, N’ProcessorNameString’;
——

— Gives you the model number and rated clock speed of your processor(s)
— Your processors may be running at less than the rated clock speed due
— to the Windows Power Plan or hardware power management

— You can use CPU-Z to get your actual CPU core speed and a lot of other useful information
— http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/cpu-z.html

— You can learn more about processor selection for SQL Server by following this link
— http://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn/processor-selection-for-sql-server/

— Get information on location, time and size of any memory dumps from SQL Server (Query 19) (Memory Dump Info)
SELECT [filename], creation_time, size_in_bytes/1048576.0 AS [Size (MB)]
FROM sys.dm_server_memory_dumps WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY creation_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— This will not return any rows if you have
— not had any memory dumps (which is a good thing)

— File names and paths for all user and system databases on instance (Query 20) (Database Filenames and Paths)
SELECT DB_NAME([database_id]) AS [Database Name],
[file_id], name, physical_name, type_desc, state_desc,
is_percent_growth, growth,
CONVERT(bigint, growth/128.0) AS [Growth in MB],
CONVERT(bigint, size/128.0) AS [Total Size in MB]
FROM sys.master_files WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY DB_NAME([database_id]) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Things to look at:
— Are data files and log files on different drives?
— Is everything on the C: drive?
— Is TempDB on dedicated drives?
— Is there only one TempDB data file?
— Are all of the TempDB data files the same size?
— Are there multiple data files for user databases?
— Is percent growth enabled for any files (which is bad)?

— Volume info for all LUNS that have database files on the current instance (Query 21) (Volume Info)
SELECT DISTINCT vs.volume_mount_point, vs.file_system_type,
vs.logical_volume_name, CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2),vs.total_bytes/1073741824.0) AS [Total Size (GB)],
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), vs.available_bytes/1073741824.0) AS [Available Size (GB)],
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), vs.available_bytes * 1. / vs.total_bytes * 100.) AS [Space Free %]
FROM sys.master_files AS f WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_os_volume_stats(f.database_id, f.[file_id]) AS vs
ORDER BY vs.volume_mount_point OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Shows you the total and free space on the LUNs where you have database files
— Being low on free space can negatively affect performance

— Drive level latency information (Query 22) (Drive Level Latency)
— Based on code from Jimmy May
SELECT tab.[Drive], tab.volume_mount_point AS [Volume Mount Point],
CASE
WHEN num_of_reads = 0 THEN 0
ELSE (io_stall_read_ms/num_of_reads)
END AS [Read Latency],
CASE
WHEN num_of_writes = 0 THEN 0
ELSE (io_stall_write_ms/num_of_writes)
END AS [Write Latency],
CASE
WHEN (num_of_reads = 0 AND num_of_writes = 0) THEN 0
ELSE (io_stall/(num_of_reads + num_of_writes))
END AS [Overall Latency],
CASE
WHEN num_of_reads = 0 THEN 0
ELSE (num_of_bytes_read/num_of_reads)
END AS [Avg Bytes/Read],
CASE
WHEN num_of_writes = 0 THEN 0
ELSE (num_of_bytes_written/num_of_writes)
END AS [Avg Bytes/Write],
CASE
WHEN (num_of_reads = 0 AND num_of_writes = 0) THEN 0
ELSE ((num_of_bytes_read + num_of_bytes_written)/(num_of_reads + num_of_writes))
END AS [Avg Bytes/Transfer]
FROM (SELECT LEFT(UPPER(mf.physical_name), 2) AS Drive, SUM(num_of_reads) AS num_of_reads,
SUM(io_stall_read_ms) AS io_stall_read_ms, SUM(num_of_writes) AS num_of_writes,
SUM(io_stall_write_ms) AS io_stall_write_ms, SUM(num_of_bytes_read) AS num_of_bytes_read,
SUM(num_of_bytes_written) AS num_of_bytes_written, SUM(io_stall) AS io_stall, vs.volume_mount_point
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(NULL, NULL) AS vfs
INNER JOIN sys.master_files AS mf WITH (NOLOCK)
ON vfs.database_id = mf.database_id AND vfs.file_id = mf.file_id
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_os_volume_stats(mf.database_id, mf.[file_id]) AS vs
GROUP BY LEFT(UPPER(mf.physical_name), 2), vs.volume_mount_point) AS tab
ORDER BY [Overall Latency] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Shows you the drive-level latency for reads and writes, in milliseconds
— Latency above 20-25ms is usually a problem

— Calculates average stalls per read, per write, and per total input/output for each database file (Query 23) (IO Stalls by File)
SELECT DB_NAME(fs.database_id) AS [Database Name], CAST(fs.io_stall_read_ms/(1.0 + fs.num_of_reads) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_read_stall_ms],
CAST(fs.io_stall_write_ms/(1.0 + fs.num_of_writes) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_write_stall_ms],
CAST((fs.io_stall_read_ms + fs.io_stall_write_ms)/(1.0 + fs.num_of_reads + fs.num_of_writes) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_io_stall_ms],
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), mf.size/128.0) AS [File Size (MB)], mf.physical_name, mf.type_desc, fs.io_stall_read_ms, fs.num_of_reads,
fs.io_stall_write_ms, fs.num_of_writes, fs.io_stall_read_ms + fs.io_stall_write_ms AS [io_stalls], fs.num_of_reads + fs.num_of_writes AS [total_io]
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(null,null) AS fs
INNER JOIN sys.master_files AS mf WITH (NOLOCK)
ON fs.database_id = mf.database_id
AND fs.[file_id] = mf.[file_id]
ORDER BY avg_io_stall_ms DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Helps determine which database files on the entire instance have the most I/O bottlenecks
— This can help you decide whether certain LUNs are overloaded and whether you might
— want to move some files to a different location or perhaps improve your I/O performance
— These latency numbers include all file activity against each SQL Server
— database file since SQL Server was last started

— Look for I/O requests taking longer than 15 seconds in the five most recent SQL Server Error Logs (Query 24) (IO Warnings)
CREATE TABLE #IOWarningResults(LogDate datetime, ProcessInfo sysname, LogText nvarchar(1000));

INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults
EXEC xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N’taking longer than 15 seconds’;

INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults
EXEC xp_readerrorlog 1, 1, N’taking longer than 15 seconds’;

INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults
EXEC xp_readerrorlog 2, 1, N’taking longer than 15 seconds’;

INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults
EXEC xp_readerrorlog 3, 1, N’taking longer than 15 seconds’;

INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults
EXEC xp_readerrorlog 4, 1, N’taking longer than 15 seconds’;

SELECT LogDate, ProcessInfo, LogText
FROM #IOWarningResults
ORDER BY LogDate DESC;

DROP TABLE #IOWarningResults;
——

— Finding 15 second I/O warnings in the SQL Server Error Log is useful evidence of
— poor I/O performance (which might have many different causes)
— Look to see if you see any patterns in the results (same files, same drives, same time of day, etc.)

— Diagnostics in SQL Server help detect stalled and stuck I/O operations
— https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/897284

— Recovery model, log reuse wait description, log file size, log usage size (Query 25) (Database Properties)
— and compatibility level for all databases on instance
SELECT db.[name] AS [Database Name], db.recovery_model_desc AS [Recovery Model], db.state_desc, db.containment_desc,
db.log_reuse_wait_desc AS [Log Reuse Wait Description],
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), ls.cntr_value/1024.0) AS [Log Size (MB)], CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), lu.cntr_value/1024.0) AS [Log Used (MB)],
CAST(CAST(lu.cntr_value AS FLOAT) / CAST(ls.cntr_value AS FLOAT)AS DECIMAL(18,2)) * 100 AS [Log Used %],
db.[compatibility_level] AS [DB Compatibility Level],
db.page_verify_option_desc AS [Page Verify Option], db.is_auto_create_stats_on, db.is_auto_update_stats_on,
db.is_auto_update_stats_async_on, db.is_parameterization_forced,
db.snapshot_isolation_state_desc, db.is_read_committed_snapshot_on,
db.is_auto_close_on, db.is_auto_shrink_on, db.target_recovery_time_in_seconds, db.is_cdc_enabled,
db.is_published, db.group_database_id, db.replica_id
FROM sys.databases AS db WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_performance_counters AS lu WITH (NOLOCK)
ON db.name = lu.instance_name
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_performance_counters AS ls WITH (NOLOCK)
ON db.name = ls.instance_name
WHERE lu.counter_name LIKE N’Log File(s) Used Size (KB)%’
AND ls.counter_name LIKE N’Log File(s) Size (KB)%’
AND ls.cntr_value > 0 OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Things to look at:
— How many databases are on the instance?
— What recovery models are they using?
— What is the log reuse wait description?
— How full are the transaction logs?
— What compatibility level are the databases on?
— What is the Page Verify Option? (should be CHECKSUM)
— Is Auto Update Statistics Asynchronously enabled?
— Make sure auto_shrink and auto_close are not enabled!

— Missing Indexes for all databases by Index Advantage (Query 26) (Missing Indexes All Databases)
SELECT CONVERT(decimal(18,2), user_seeks * avg_total_user_cost * (avg_user_impact * 0.01)) AS [index_advantage],
migs.last_user_seek, mid.[statement] AS [Database.Schema.Table],
mid.equality_columns, mid.inequality_columns, mid.included_columns,
migs.unique_compiles, migs.user_seeks, migs.avg_total_user_cost, migs.avg_user_impact
FROM sys.dm_db_missing_index_group_stats AS migs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_groups AS mig WITH (NOLOCK)
ON migs.group_handle = mig.index_group_handle
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_details AS mid WITH (NOLOCK)
ON mig.index_handle = mid.index_handle
ORDER BY index_advantage DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Getting missing index information for all of the databases on the instance is very useful
— Look at last user seek time, number of user seeks to help determine source and importance
— Also look at avg_user_impact and avg_total_user_cost to help determine importance
— SQL Server is overly eager to add included columns, so beware
— Do not just blindly add indexes that show up from this query!!!

— Get VLF Counts for all databases on the instance (Query 27) (VLF Counts)
— (adapted from Michelle Ufford)
CREATE TABLE #VLFInfo (RecoveryUnitID int, FileID int,
FileSize bigint, StartOffset bigint,
FSeqNo bigint, [Status] bigint,
Parity bigint, CreateLSN numeric(38));

CREATE TABLE #VLFCountResults(DatabaseName sysname, VLFCount int);

EXEC sp_MSforeachdb N’Use [?];

INSERT INTO #VLFInfo
EXEC sp_executesql N”DBCC LOGINFO([?])”;

INSERT INTO #VLFCountResults
SELECT DB_NAME(), COUNT(*)
FROM #VLFInfo;

TRUNCATE TABLE #VLFInfo;’

SELECT DatabaseName, VLFCount
FROM #VLFCountResults
ORDER BY VLFCount DESC;

DROP TABLE #VLFInfo;
DROP TABLE #VLFCountResults;
——

— High VLF counts can affect write performance
— and they can make full database restores and recovery take much longer
— Try to keep your VLF counts under 200 in most cases

— Get CPU utilization by database (Query 28) (CPU Usage by Database)
WITH DB_CPU_Stats
AS
(SELECT pa.DatabaseID, DB_Name(pa.DatabaseID) AS [Database Name], SUM(qs.total_worker_time/1000) AS [CPU_Time_Ms]
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY (SELECT CONVERT(int, value) AS [DatabaseID]
FROM sys.dm_exec_plan_attributes(qs.plan_handle)
WHERE attribute = N’dbid’) AS pa
GROUP BY DatabaseID)
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY [CPU_Time_Ms] DESC) AS [CPU Rank],
[Database Name], [CPU_Time_Ms] AS [CPU Time (ms)],
CAST([CPU_Time_Ms] * 1.0 / SUM([CPU_Time_Ms]) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5, 2)) AS [CPU Percent]
FROM DB_CPU_Stats
WHERE DatabaseID <> 32767 — ResourceDB
ORDER BY [CPU Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Helps determine which database is using the most CPU resources on the instance

— Get I/O utilization by database (Query 29) (IO Usage By Database)
WITH Aggregate_IO_Statistics
AS
(SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name],
CAST(SUM(num_of_bytes_read + num_of_bytes_written)/1048576 AS DECIMAL(12, 2)) AS io_in_mb
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(NULL, NULL) AS [DM_IO_STATS]
GROUP BY database_id)
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY io_in_mb DESC) AS [I/O Rank], [Database Name], io_in_mb AS [Total I/O (MB)],
CAST(io_in_mb/ SUM(io_in_mb) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5,2)) AS [I/O Percent]
FROM Aggregate_IO_Statistics
ORDER BY [I/O Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Helps determine which database is using the most I/O resources on the instance

— Get total buffer usage by database for current instance (Query 30) (Total Buffer Usage by Database)
— This make take some time to run on a busy instance
WITH AggregateBufferPoolUsage
AS
(SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name],
CAST(COUNT(*) * 8/1024.0 AS DECIMAL (10,2)) AS [CachedSize]
FROM sys.dm_os_buffer_descriptors WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE database_id <> 32767 — ResourceDB
GROUP BY DB_NAME(database_id))
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY CachedSize DESC) AS [Buffer Pool Rank], [Database Name], CachedSize AS [Cached Size (MB)],
CAST(CachedSize / SUM(CachedSize) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5,2)) AS [Buffer Pool Percent]
FROM AggregateBufferPoolUsage
ORDER BY [Buffer Pool Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Tells you how much memory (in the buffer pool)
— is being used by each database on the instance

— Clear Wait Stats with this command
— DBCC SQLPERF(‘sys.dm_os_wait_stats’, CLEAR);

— Isolate top waits for server instance since last restart or wait statistics clear (Query 31) (Top Waits)
WITH [Waits]
AS (SELECT wait_type, wait_time_ms/ 1000.0 AS [WaitS],
(wait_time_ms – signal_wait_time_ms) / 1000.0 AS [ResourceS],
signal_wait_time_ms / 1000.0 AS [SignalS],
waiting_tasks_count AS [WaitCount],
100.0 * wait_time_ms / SUM (wait_time_ms) OVER() AS [Percentage],
ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY wait_time_ms DESC) AS [RowNum]
FROM sys.dm_os_wait_stats WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE [wait_type] NOT IN (
N’BROKER_EVENTHANDLER’, N’BROKER_RECEIVE_WAITFOR’, N’BROKER_TASK_STOP’,
N’BROKER_TO_FLUSH’, N’BROKER_TRANSMITTER’, N’CHECKPOINT_QUEUE’,
N’CHKPT’, N’CLR_AUTO_EVENT’, N’CLR_MANUAL_EVENT’, N’CLR_SEMAPHORE’,
N’DBMIRROR_DBM_EVENT’, N’DBMIRROR_EVENTS_QUEUE’, N’DBMIRROR_WORKER_QUEUE’,
N’DBMIRRORING_CMD’, N’DIRTY_PAGE_POLL’, N’DISPATCHER_QUEUE_SEMAPHORE’,
N’EXECSYNC’, N’FSAGENT’, N’FT_IFTS_SCHEDULER_IDLE_WAIT’, N’FT_IFTSHC_MUTEX’,
N’HADR_CLUSAPI_CALL’, N’HADR_FILESTREAM_IOMGR_IOCOMPLETION’, N’HADR_LOGCAPTURE_WAIT’,
N’HADR_NOTIFICATION_DEQUEUE’, N’HADR_TIMER_TASK’, N’HADR_WORK_QUEUE’,
N’KSOURCE_WAKEUP’, N’LAZYWRITER_SLEEP’, N’LOGMGR_QUEUE’, N’ONDEMAND_TASK_QUEUE’,
N’PWAIT_ALL_COMPONENTS_INITIALIZED’, N’QDS_PERSIST_TASK_MAIN_LOOP_SLEEP’,
N’QDS_CLEANUP_STALE_QUERIES_TASK_MAIN_LOOP_SLEEP’, N’REQUEST_FOR_DEADLOCK_SEARCH’,
N’RESOURCE_QUEUE’, N’SERVER_IDLE_CHECK’, N’SLEEP_BPOOL_FLUSH’, N’SLEEP_DBSTARTUP’,
N’SLEEP_DCOMSTARTUP’, N’SLEEP_MASTERDBREADY’, N’SLEEP_MASTERMDREADY’,
N’SLEEP_MASTERUPGRADED’, N’SLEEP_MSDBSTARTUP’, N’SLEEP_SYSTEMTASK’, N’SLEEP_TASK’,
N’SLEEP_TEMPDBSTARTUP’, N’SNI_HTTP_ACCEPT’, N’SP_SERVER_DIAGNOSTICS_SLEEP’,
N’SQLTRACE_BUFFER_FLUSH’, N’SQLTRACE_INCREMENTAL_FLUSH_SLEEP’, N’SQLTRACE_WAIT_ENTRIES’,
N’WAIT_FOR_RESULTS’, N’WAITFOR’, N’WAITFOR_TASKSHUTDOWN’, N’WAIT_XTP_HOST_WAIT’,
N’WAIT_XTP_OFFLINE_CKPT_NEW_LOG’, N’WAIT_XTP_CKPT_CLOSE’, N’XE_DISPATCHER_JOIN’,
N’XE_DISPATCHER_WAIT’, N’XE_TIMER_EVENT’)
AND waiting_tasks_count > 0)
SELECT
MAX (W1.wait_type) AS [WaitType],
CAST (MAX (W1.WaitS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Wait_Sec],
CAST (MAX (W1.ResourceS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Resource_Sec],
CAST (MAX (W1.SignalS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Signal_Sec],
MAX (W1.WaitCount) AS [Wait Count],
CAST (MAX (W1.Percentage) AS DECIMAL (5,2)) AS [Wait Percentage],
CAST ((MAX (W1.WaitS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgWait_Sec],
CAST ((MAX (W1.ResourceS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgRes_Sec],
CAST ((MAX (W1.SignalS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgSig_Sec]
FROM Waits AS W1
INNER JOIN Waits AS W2
ON W2.RowNum <= W1.RowNum GROUP BY W1.RowNum HAVING SUM (W2.Percentage) - MAX (W1.Percentage) < 99 -- percentage threshold OPTION (RECOMPILE); ------ -- Cumulative wait stats are not as useful on an idle instance that is not under load or performance pressure -- SQL Server Wait Types Library (Paul Randal) -- https://www.sqlskills.com/help/waits/ -- The SQL Server Wait Type Repository -- http://blogs.msdn.com/b/psssql/archive/2009/11/03/the-sql-server-wait-type-repository.aspx -- Wait statistics, or please tell me where it hurts -- http://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/paul/wait-statistics-or-please-tell-me-where-it-hurts/ -- SQL Server 2005 Performance Tuning using the Waits and Queues -- http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc966413.aspx -- sys.dm_os_wait_stats (Transact-SQL) -- http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms179984(v=sql.120).aspx -- Get a count of SQL connections by IP address (Query 32) (Connection Counts by IP Address) SELECT ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name], es.[host_name], es.login_name, COUNT(ec.session_id) AS [connection count] FROM sys.dm_exec_sessions AS es WITH (NOLOCK) INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_connections AS ec WITH (NOLOCK) ON es.session_id = ec.session_id GROUP BY ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name], es.[host_name], es.login_name ORDER BY ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name] OPTION (RECOMPILE); ------ -- This helps you figure where your database load is coming from -- and verifies connectivity from other machines -- Get Average Task Counts (run multiple times) (Query 33) (Avg Task Counts) SELECT AVG(current_tasks_count) AS [Avg Task Count], AVG(work_queue_count) AS [Avg Work Queue Count], AVG(runnable_tasks_count) AS [Avg Runnable Task Count], AVG(pending_disk_io_count) AS [Avg Pending DiskIO Count] FROM sys.dm_os_schedulers WITH (NOLOCK) WHERE scheduler_id < 255 OPTION (RECOMPILE); ------ -- Sustained values above 10 suggest further investigation in that area -- High Avg Task Counts are often caused by blocking/deadlocking or other resource contention -- Sustained values above 1 suggest further investigation in that area -- High Avg Runnable Task Counts are a good sign of CPU pressure -- High Avg Pending DiskIO Counts are a sign of disk pressure -- Detect blocking (run multiple times) (Query 34) (Detect Blocking) SELECT t1.resource_type AS [lock type], DB_NAME(resource_database_id) AS [database], t1.resource_associated_entity_id AS [blk object],t1.request_mode AS [lock req], --- lock requested t1.request_session_id AS [waiter sid], t2.wait_duration_ms AS [wait time], -- spid of waiter (SELECT [text] FROM sys.dm_exec_requests AS r WITH (NOLOCK) -- get sql for waiter CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(r.[sql_handle]) WHERE r.session_id = t1.request_session_id) AS [waiter_batch], (SELECT SUBSTRING(qt.[text],r.statement_start_offset/2, (CASE WHEN r.statement_end_offset = -1 THEN LEN(CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qt.[text])) * 2 ELSE r.statement_end_offset END - r.statement_start_offset)/2) FROM sys.dm_exec_requests AS r WITH (NOLOCK) CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(r.[sql_handle]) AS qt WHERE r.session_id = t1.request_session_id) AS [waiter_stmt], -- statement blocked t2.blocking_session_id AS [blocker sid], -- spid of blocker (SELECT [text] FROM sys.sysprocesses AS p -- get sql for blocker CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(p.[sql_handle]) WHERE p.spid = t2.blocking_session_id) AS [blocker_batch] FROM sys.dm_tran_locks AS t1 WITH (NOLOCK) INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_waiting_tasks AS t2 WITH (NOLOCK) ON t1.lock_owner_address = t2.resource_address OPTION (RECOMPILE); ------ -- Helps troubleshoot blocking and deadlocking issues -- The results will change from second to second on a busy system -- You should run this query multiple times when you see signs of blocking -- Get CPU Utilization History for last 256 minutes (in one minute intervals) (Query 35) (CPU Utilization History) -- This version works with SQL Server 2012 DECLARE @ts_now bigint = (SELECT cpu_ticks/(cpu_ticks/ms_ticks) FROM sys.dm_os_sys_info WITH (NOLOCK)); SELECT TOP(256) SQLProcessUtilization AS [SQL Server Process CPU Utilization], SystemIdle AS [System Idle Process], 100 - SystemIdle - SQLProcessUtilization AS [Other Process CPU Utilization], DATEADD(ms, -1 * (@ts_now - [timestamp]), GETDATE()) AS [Event Time] FROM (SELECT record.value('(./Record/@id)[1]', 'int') AS record_id, record.value('(./Record/SchedulerMonitorEvent/SystemHealth/SystemIdle)[1]', 'int') AS [SystemIdle], record.value('(./Record/SchedulerMonitorEvent/SystemHealth/ProcessUtilization)[1]', 'int') AS [SQLProcessUtilization], [timestamp] FROM (SELECT [timestamp], CONVERT(xml, record) AS [record] FROM sys.dm_os_ring_buffers WITH (NOLOCK) WHERE ring_buffer_type = N'RING_BUFFER_SCHEDULER_MONITOR' AND record LIKE N'%%’) AS x) AS y
ORDER BY record_id DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Look at the trend over the entire period.
— Also look at high sustained Other Process CPU Utilization values

— Get top total worker time queries for entire instance (Query 36) (Top Worker Time Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], LEFT(t.[text], 50) AS [Short Query Text],
qs.total_worker_time AS [Total Worker Time], qs.min_worker_time AS [Min Worker Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time],
qs.max_worker_time AS [Max Worker Time],
qs.min_elapsed_time AS [Min Elapsed Time],
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time],
qs.max_elapsed_time AS [Max Elapsed Time],
qs.min_logical_reads AS [Min Logical Reads],
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
qs.max_logical_reads AS [Max Logical Reads],
qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count], qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
— ,t.[text] AS [Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] — uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp
ORDER BY qs.total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Helps you find the most expensive queries from a CPU perspective across the entire instance
— Can also help track down parameter sniffing issues

— Page Life Expectancy (PLE) value for each NUMA node in current instance (Query 37) (PLE by NUMA Node)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], [object_name], instance_name, cntr_value AS [Page Life Expectancy]
FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE [object_name] LIKE N’%Buffer Node%’ — Handles named instances
AND counter_name = N’Page life expectancy’ OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— PLE is a good measurement of memory pressure
— Higher PLE is better. Watch the trend over time, not the absolute value
— This will only return one row for non-NUMA systems

— Page Life Expectancy isn�t what you think�
— http://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/paul/page-life-expectancy-isnt-what-you-think/

— Memory Grants Pending value for current instance (Query 38) (Memory Grants Pending)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], [object_name], cntr_value AS [Memory Grants Pending]
FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE [object_name] LIKE N’%Memory Manager%’ — Handles named instances
AND counter_name = N’Memory Grants Pending’ OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Memory Grants Pending above zero for a sustained period is a very strong indicator of memory pressure

— Memory Clerk Usage for instance (Query 39) (Memory Clerk Usage)
— Look for high value for CACHESTORE_SQLCP (Ad-hoc query plans)
SELECT TOP(10) mc.[type] AS [Memory Clerk Type],
CAST((SUM(mc.pages_kb)/1024.0) AS DECIMAL (15,2)) AS [Memory Usage (MB)]
FROM sys.dm_os_memory_clerks AS mc WITH (NOLOCK)
GROUP BY mc.[type]
ORDER BY SUM(mc.pages_kb) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— MEMORYCLERK_SQLBUFFERPOOL was new for SQL Server 2012. It should be your highest consumer of memory

— CACHESTORE_SQLCP SQL Plans
— These are cached SQL statements or batches that aren’t in stored procedures, functions and triggers
— Watch out for high values for CACHESTORE_SQLCP

— CACHESTORE_OBJCP Object Plans
— These are compiled plans for stored procedures, functions and triggers

— Find single-use, ad-hoc and prepared queries that are bloating the plan cache (Query 40) (Ad hoc Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) [text] AS [QueryText], cp.cacheobjtype, cp.objtype, cp.size_in_bytes/1024 AS [Plan Size in KB]
FROM sys.dm_exec_cached_plans AS cp WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle)
WHERE cp.cacheobjtype = N’Compiled Plan’
AND cp.objtype IN (N’Adhoc’, N’Prepared’)
AND cp.usecounts = 1
ORDER BY cp.size_in_bytes DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Gives you the text, type and size of single-use ad-hoc and prepared queries that waste space in the plan cache
— Enabling ‘optimize for ad hoc workloads’ for the instance can help (SQL Server 2008 and above only)
— Running DBCC FREESYSTEMCACHE (‘SQL Plans’) periodically may be required to better control this
— Enabling forced parameterization for the database can help, but test first!

— Plan cache, adhoc workloads and clearing the single-use plan cache bloat
— http://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/kimberly/plan-cache-adhoc-workloads-and-clearing-the-single-use-plan-cache-bloat/

— Get top total logical reads queries for entire instance (Query 41) (Top Logical Reads Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], LEFT(t.[text], 50) AS [Short Query Text],
qs.total_logical_reads AS [Total Logical Reads],
qs.min_logical_reads AS [Min Logical Reads],
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
qs.max_logical_reads AS [Max Logical Reads],
qs.min_worker_time AS [Min Worker Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time],
qs.max_worker_time AS [Max Worker Time],
qs.min_elapsed_time AS [Min Elapsed Time],
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time],
qs.max_elapsed_time AS [Max Elapsed Time],
qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count], qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
— ,t.[text] AS [Complete Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] — uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_reads DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Helps you find the most expensive queries from a memory perspective across the entire instance
— Can also help track down parameter sniffing issues

— Database specific queries *****************************************************************

— **** Switch to a user database that you are interested in *****
USE YourDatabaseName; — make sure to change to an actual database on your instance, not the master system database
GO

— Individual File Sizes and space available for current database (Query 42) (File Sizes and Space)
SELECT f.name AS [File Name] , f.physical_name AS [Physical Name],
CAST((f.size/128.0) AS DECIMAL(15,2)) AS [Total Size in MB],
CAST(f.size/128.0 – CAST(FILEPROPERTY(f.name, ‘SpaceUsed’) AS int)/128.0 AS DECIMAL(15,2))
AS [Available Space In MB], f.[file_id], fg.name AS [Filegroup Name],
f.is_percent_growth, f.growth,
fg.is_default, fg.is_read_only
FROM sys.database_files AS f WITH (NOLOCK)
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.filegroups AS fg WITH (NOLOCK)
ON f.data_space_id = fg.data_space_id
ORDER BY f.[file_id] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Look at how large and how full the files are and where they are located
— Make sure the transaction log is not full!!

— I/O Statistics by file for the current database (Query 43) (IO Stats By File)
SELECT DB_NAME(DB_ID()) AS [Database Name], df.name AS [Logical Name], vfs.[file_id], df.type_desc,
df.physical_name AS [Physical Name], CAST(vfs.size_on_disk_bytes/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Size on Disk (MB)],
vfs.num_of_reads, vfs.num_of_writes, vfs.io_stall_read_ms, vfs.io_stall_write_ms,
CAST(100. * vfs.io_stall_read_ms/(vfs.io_stall_read_ms + vfs.io_stall_write_ms) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [IO Stall Reads Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.io_stall_write_ms/(vfs.io_stall_write_ms + vfs.io_stall_read_ms) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [IO Stall Writes Pct],
(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS [Writes + Reads],
CAST(vfs.num_of_bytes_read/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [MB Read],
CAST(vfs.num_of_bytes_written/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [MB Written],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_reads/(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [# Reads Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_writes/(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [# Write Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_bytes_read/(vfs.num_of_bytes_read + vfs.num_of_bytes_written) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [Read Bytes Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_bytes_written/(vfs.num_of_bytes_read + vfs.num_of_bytes_written) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [Written Bytes Pct]
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(DB_ID(), NULL) AS vfs
INNER JOIN sys.database_files AS df WITH (NOLOCK)
ON vfs.[file_id]= df.[file_id] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— This helps you characterize your workload better from an I/O perspective for this database
— It helps you determine whether you has an OLTP or DW/DSS type of workload

— Get most frequently executed queries for this database (Query 44) (Query Execution Counts)
SELECT TOP(50) LEFT(t.[text], 50) AS [Short Query Text], qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
qs.total_logical_reads AS [Total Logical Reads],
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
qs.total_worker_time AS [Total Worker Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time],
qs.total_elapsed_time AS [Total Elapsed Time],
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time],
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
–,t.[text] AS [Complete Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] — uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE t.dbid = DB_ID()
ORDER BY qs.execution_count DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Top Cached SPs By Execution Count (Query 45) (SP Execution Counts)
SELECT TOP(100) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.execution_count,
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [AvgWorkerTime], qs.total_worker_time AS [TotalWorkerTime],
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
qs.cached_time
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
ORDER BY qs.execution_count DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Tells you which cached stored procedures are called the most often
— This helps you characterize and baseline your workload

— Top Cached SPs By Avg Elapsed Time (Query 46) (SP Avg Elapsed Time)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.min_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
qs.max_elapsed_time, qs.last_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.execution_count,
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [AvgWorkerTime],
qs.total_worker_time AS [TotalWorkerTime], qs.cached_time
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
ORDER BY avg_elapsed_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— This helps you find high average elapsed time cached stored procedures that
— may be easy to optimize with standard query tuning techniques

— Top Cached SPs By Total Worker time. Worker time relates to CPU cost (Query 47) (SP Worker Time)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_worker_time AS [TotalWorkerTime],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [AvgWorkerTime], qs.execution_count,
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count
AS [avg_elapsed_time], qs.cached_time
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
ORDER BY qs.total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a CPU perspective
— You should look at this if you see signs of CPU pressure

— Top Cached SPs By Total Logical Reads. Logical reads relate to memory pressure (Query 48) (SP Logical Reads)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_logical_reads AS [TotalLogicalReads],
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [AvgLogicalReads],qs.execution_count,
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count
AS [avg_elapsed_time], qs.cached_time
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_reads DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a memory perspective
— You should look at this if you see signs of memory pressure

— Top Cached SPs By Total Physical Reads. Physical reads relate to disk read I/O pressure (Query 49) (SP Physical Reads)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name],qs.total_physical_reads AS [TotalPhysicalReads],
qs.total_physical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [AvgPhysicalReads], qs.execution_count,
qs.total_logical_reads,qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count
AS [avg_elapsed_time], qs.cached_time
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND qs.total_physical_reads > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_physical_reads DESC, qs.total_logical_reads DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a read I/O perspective
— You should look at this if you see signs of I/O pressure or of memory pressure

— Top Cached SPs By Total Logical Writes (Query 50) (SP Logical Writes)
— Logical writes relate to both memory and disk I/O pressure
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_logical_writes AS [TotalLogicalWrites],
qs.total_logical_writes/qs.execution_count AS [AvgLogicalWrites], qs.execution_count,
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
qs.cached_time
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND qs.total_logical_writes > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_writes DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a write I/O perspective
— You should look at this if you see signs of I/O pressure or of memory pressure

— Lists the top statements by average input/output usage for the current database (Query 51) (Top IO Statements)
SELECT TOP(50) OBJECT_NAME(qt.objectid, dbid) AS [SP Name],
(qs.total_logical_reads + qs.total_logical_writes) /qs.execution_count AS [Avg IO], qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
SUBSTRING(qt.[text],qs.statement_start_offset/2,
(CASE
WHEN qs.statement_end_offset = -1
THEN LEN(CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qt.[text])) * 2
ELSE qs.statement_end_offset
END – qs.statement_start_offset)/2) AS [Query Text]
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(qs.sql_handle) AS qt
WHERE qt.[dbid] = DB_ID()
ORDER BY [Avg IO] DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Helps you find the most expensive statements for I/O by SP

— Possible Bad NC Indexes (writes > reads) (Query 52) (Bad NC Indexes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(s.[object_id]) AS [Table Name], i.name AS [Index Name], i.index_id,
i.is_disabled, i.is_hypothetical, i.has_filter, i.fill_factor,
user_updates AS [Total Writes], user_seeks + user_scans + user_lookups AS [Total Reads],
user_updates – (user_seeks + user_scans + user_lookups) AS [Difference]
FROM sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON s.[object_id] = i.[object_id]
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(s.[object_id],’IsUserTable’) = 1
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
AND user_updates > (user_seeks + user_scans + user_lookups)
AND i.index_id > 1
ORDER BY [Difference] DESC, [Total Writes] DESC, [Total Reads] ASC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Look for indexes with high numbers of writes and zero or very low numbers of reads
— Consider your complete workload, and how long your instance has been running
— Investigate further before dropping an index!

— Missing Indexes for current database by Index Advantage (Query 53) (Missing Indexes)
SELECT DISTINCT CONVERT(decimal(18,2), user_seeks * avg_total_user_cost * (avg_user_impact * 0.01)) AS [index_advantage],
migs.last_user_seek, mid.[statement] AS [Database.Schema.Table],
mid.equality_columns, mid.inequality_columns, mid.included_columns,
migs.unique_compiles, migs.user_seeks, migs.avg_total_user_cost, migs.avg_user_impact,
OBJECT_NAME(mid.[object_id]) AS [Table Name], p.rows AS [Table Rows]
FROM sys.dm_db_missing_index_group_stats AS migs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_groups AS mig WITH (NOLOCK)
ON migs.group_handle = mig.index_group_handle
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_details AS mid WITH (NOLOCK)
ON mig.index_handle = mid.index_handle
INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = mid.[object_id]
WHERE mid.database_id = DB_ID()
ORDER BY index_advantage DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Look at index advantage, last user seek time, number of user seeks to help determine source and importance
— SQL Server is overly eager to add included columns, so beware
— Do not just blindly add indexes that show up from this query!!!

— Find missing index warnings for cached plans in the current database (Query 54) (Missing Index Warnings)
— Note: This query could take some time on a busy instance
SELECT TOP(25) OBJECT_NAME(objectid) AS [ObjectName],
query_plan, cp.objtype, cp.usecounts, cp.size_in_bytes
FROM sys.dm_exec_cached_plans AS cp WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(cp.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE CAST(query_plan AS NVARCHAR(MAX)) LIKE N’%MissingIndex%’
AND dbid = DB_ID()
ORDER BY cp.usecounts DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Helps you connect missing indexes to specific stored procedures or queries
— This can help you decide whether to add them or not

— Breaks down buffers used by current database by object (table, index) in the buffer cache (Query 55) (Buffer Usage)
— Note: This query could take some time on a busy instance
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) AS [Object Name], p.index_id,
CAST(COUNT(*)/128.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Buffer size(MB)],
COUNT(*) AS [BufferCount], p.Rows AS [Row Count],
p.data_compression_desc AS [Compression Type]
FROM sys.allocation_units AS a WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_buffer_descriptors AS b WITH (NOLOCK)
ON a.allocation_unit_id = b.allocation_unit_id
INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON a.container_id = p.hobt_id
WHERE b.database_id = CONVERT(int,DB_ID())
AND p.[object_id] > 100
GROUP BY p.[object_id], p.index_id, p.data_compression_desc, p.[Rows]
ORDER BY [BufferCount] DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Tells you what tables and indexes are using the most memory in the buffer cache
— It can help identify possible candidates for data compression

— Get Table names, row counts, and compression status for clustered index or heap (Query 56) (Table Sizes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(object_id) AS [ObjectName],
SUM(Rows) AS [RowCount], data_compression_desc AS [CompressionType]
FROM sys.partitions WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE index_id < 2 --ignore the partitions from the non-clustered index if any AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'sys%' AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'queue_%' AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'filestream_tombstone%' AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'fulltext%' AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'ifts_comp_fragment%' AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'filetable_updates%' AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'xml_index_nodes%' GROUP BY object_id, data_compression_desc ORDER BY SUM(Rows) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE); ------ -- Gives you an idea of table sizes, and possible data compression opportunities -- Get some key table properties (Query 57) (Table Properties) SELECT OBJECT_NAME(t.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], p.[rows] AS [Table Rows], p.index_id, p.data_compression_desc AS [Index Data Compression], t.create_date, t.lock_on_bulk_load, t.is_replicated, t.has_replication_filter, t.is_tracked_by_cdc, t.lock_escalation_desc, t.is_filetable FROM sys.tables AS t WITH (NOLOCK) INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p WITH (NOLOCK) ON t.[object_id] = p.[object_id] WHERE OBJECT_NAME(t.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'sys%' ORDER BY OBJECT_NAME(t.[object_id]), p.index_id OPTION (RECOMPILE); ------ -- Gives you some good information about your tables -- When were Statistics last updated on all indexes? (Query 58) (Statistics Update) SELECT SCHEMA_NAME(o.Schema_ID) + N'.' + o.NAME AS [Object Name], o.type_desc AS [Object Type], i.name AS [Index Name], STATS_DATE(i.[object_id], i.index_id) AS [Statistics Date], s.auto_created, s.no_recompute, s.user_created, s.is_temporary, st.row_count, st.used_page_count FROM sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK) INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK) ON o.[object_id] = i.[object_id] INNER JOIN sys.stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK) ON i.[object_id] = s.[object_id] AND i.index_id = s.stats_id INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_partition_stats AS st WITH (NOLOCK) ON o.[object_id] = st.[object_id] AND i.[index_id] = st.[index_id] WHERE o.[type] IN ('U', 'V') AND st.row_count > 0
ORDER BY STATS_DATE(i.[object_id], i.index_id) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Helps discover possible problems with out-of-date statistics
— Also gives you an idea which indexes are the most active

— Look at most frequently modified indexes and statistics (Query 59) (Volatile Indexes)
SELECT o.name AS [Object Name], o.[object_id], o.type_desc, s.name AS [Statistics Name],
s.stats_id, s.no_recompute, s.auto_created,
sp.modification_counter, sp.rows, sp.rows_sampled, sp.last_updated
FROM sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON s.object_id = o.object_id
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_db_stats_properties(s.object_id, s.stats_id) AS sp
WHERE o.type_desc NOT IN (N’SYSTEM_TABLE’, N’INTERNAL_TABLE’)
AND sp.modification_counter > 0
ORDER BY sp.modification_counter DESC, o.name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Get fragmentation info for all indexes above a certain size in the current database (Query 60) (Index Fragmentation)
— Note: This query could take some time on a very large database
SELECT DB_NAME(ps.database_id) AS [Database Name], SCHEMA_NAME(o.[schema_id]) AS [Schema Name],
OBJECT_NAME(ps.OBJECT_ID) AS [Object Name],
i.name AS [Index Name], ps.index_id, ps.index_type_desc, ps.avg_fragmentation_in_percent,
ps.fragment_count, ps.page_count, i.fill_factor, i.has_filter, i.filter_definition, i.allow_page_locks
FROM sys.dm_db_index_physical_stats(DB_ID(),NULL, NULL, NULL , N’LIMITED’) AS ps
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ps.[object_id] = i.[object_id]
AND ps.index_id = i.index_id
INNER JOIN sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = o.[object_id]
WHERE ps.database_id = DB_ID()
AND ps.page_count > 2500
ORDER BY ps.avg_fragmentation_in_percent DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— Helps determine whether you have framentation in your relational indexes
— and how effective your index maintenance strategy is

— Index Read/Write stats (all tables in current DB) ordered by Reads (Query 61) (Overall Index Usage – Reads)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], i.name AS [IndexName], i.index_id,
s.user_seeks, s.user_scans, s.user_lookups,
s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups AS [Total Reads],
s.user_updates AS [Writes],
i.type_desc AS [Index Type], i.fill_factor AS [Fill Factor], i.has_filter, i.filter_definition,
s.last_user_scan, s.last_user_lookup, s.last_user_seek
FROM sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = s.[object_id]
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(i.[object_id],’IsUserTable’) = 1
ORDER BY s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE); — Order by reads
——

— Show which indexes in the current database are most active for Reads

— Index Read/Write stats (all tables in current DB) ordered by Writes (Query 62) (Overall Index Usage – Writes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], i.name AS [IndexName], i.index_id,
s.user_updates AS [Writes], s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups AS [Total Reads],
i.type_desc AS [Index Type], i.fill_factor AS [Fill Factor], i.has_filter, i.filter_definition,
s.last_system_update, s.last_user_update
FROM sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = s.[object_id]
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(i.[object_id],’IsUserTable’) = 1
ORDER BY s.user_updates DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE); — Order by writes
——

— Show which indexes in the current database are most active for Writes

— Get lock waits for current database (Query 63) (Lock Waits)
SELECT o.name AS [table_name], i.name AS [index_name], ios.index_id, ios.partition_number,
SUM(ios.row_lock_wait_count) AS [total_row_lock_waits],
SUM(ios.row_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_row_lock_wait_in_ms],
SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_count) AS [total_page_lock_waits],
SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_page_lock_wait_in_ms],
SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms)+ SUM(row_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_lock_wait_in_ms]
FROM sys.dm_db_index_operational_stats(DB_ID(), NULL, NULL, NULL) AS ios
INNER JOIN sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ios.[object_id] = o.[object_id]
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ios.[object_id] = i.[object_id]
AND ios.index_id = i.index_id
WHERE o.[object_id] > 100
GROUP BY o.name, i.name, ios.index_id, ios.partition_number
HAVING SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms)+ SUM(row_lock_wait_in_ms) > 0
ORDER BY total_lock_wait_in_ms DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

— This query is helpful for troubleshooting blocking and deadlocking issues

— Look at recent Full backups for the current database (Query 64) (Recent Full Backups)
SELECT TOP (30) bs.machine_name, bs.server_name, bs.database_name AS [Database Name], bs.recovery_model,
CONVERT (BIGINT, bs.backup_size / 1048576 ) AS [Uncompressed Backup Size (MB)],
CONVERT (BIGINT, bs.compressed_backup_size / 1048576 ) AS [Compressed Backup Size (MB)],
CONVERT (NUMERIC (20,2), (CONVERT (FLOAT, bs.backup_size) /
CONVERT (FLOAT, bs.compressed_backup_size))) AS [Compression Ratio], bs.has_backup_checksums, bs.is_copy_only,
DATEDIFF (SECOND, bs.backup_start_date, bs.backup_finish_date) AS [Backup Elapsed Time (sec)],
bs.backup_finish_date AS [Backup Finish Date]
FROM msdb.dbo.backupset AS bs WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE bs.database_name = DB_NAME(DB_ID())
AND bs.[type] = ‘D’ — Change to L if you want Log backups
ORDER BY bs.backup_finish_date DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
——

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